Bailey: Approximately 30 years old. Graphic designer, parent, fat, feminist. Cis-gendered, female pronouns.

Found here:
  • Intersectional Feminism
  • Parenting
  • Crafts and projects
  • Oversharing about opinions, personal current events, and biology
  • Multi-fandom blogging


Commissions: Open
Reblogged from riker-wears-a-skant  2,386 notes

problackgirl:

"real men dont rape" actually, real men do rape. they do. men rape. it isn’t done by ~fake mythical special brand of evil~ men, it’s done by real men, men who may seem nice, men who you think you can trust, men you know, men who you’re close to. real men do rape. that’s the problem

Reblogged from socimages  56 notes

socimages:

New Orleans voodoo: Before and after Hurricane Katrina.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

When Hurricane Katrina broke the levees of New Orleans and flooded 85% of the city, 100,000 people were left homeless. Disproportionately, these were the poor and black residents of New Orleans. This same population faced more hurdles to returning than their wealthier and whiter counterparts thanks to the effects of poverty, but also choices made by policymakers and politicians — some would say made deliberately — that reduced the black population of the city.

With them went many of the practitioners of voodoo, a faith with its origins in the merging of West African belief systems and Catholicism.  At Newsweek, Stacey Anderson writes that locals claim that the voodoo community was 2,500 to 3,000 people strong before Katrina, but after that number was reduced to around 300.

The result has been a bridging of different voodoo traditions and communities. Prior to the storm, celebrations and ceremonies were race segregated and those who adhered to Haitian- and New Orleans-style voodoo kept their distance.  After the storm, with their numbers decimated, they could no longer sustain the in-groups and out-groups they once had.  Voodoo practitioners forged bonds across prior divides.